Brewing Process 2017-07-20T07:06:53+00:00

Brewing Process

Barley to malt

Malt is made by allowing a grain to germinate, after which it is then dried in a kiln and sometimes roasted. The malt provides the base flavour and colour of the beer which will vary depending on the amount of roasting.

Mashing in and sparging

Mashing converts the starches released during the malting stage, into sugars that can be fermented resulting in a sugar rich liquid, also known as ‘Wort’.

Once the mash has had chance to do this the sparging can start. A process where additional water at a higher temperature is sprinkled on top of the mash bed to extract additional sugars.

Boiling in the copper

Boiling the wort, ensures its sterility, hops are added at various stages during the boil. Hops added during the early stages give the beer its bitterness, hops added at later stages give the beer its flavour, and aroma.

The high temperature causes proteins in the wort to coagulate and the pH of the wort to fall. The boiling process must be constant and turbulent.

Fermentation

Mashing converts the starches released during the malting stage, into sugars that can be fermented resulting in a sugar rich liquid, also known as ‘Wort’.

The wort is cooled through the heat exchanger as it is transferred into the fermenter, making it a suitable temperature for pitching the yeast. The beer then sits for about a week, depending on the rate of fermentation.